INTRAUTERINE DEVICE - IUD

Intrauterine Method

An IUD is a small, flexible1, often T-shaped device wrapped in copper that is placed inside your womb by your healthcare provider (doctor or nurse).2

INTRAUTERINE
DEVICE - IUD

Intrauterine Method

An IUD is a small, flexible, often T-shaped device wrapped in copper that is placed inside your womb by your healthcare provider.

REGIMEN2

<5-10
YEARS

BENEFITS

99% effective4

Long-acting4

Reversible4

 

    IT’S EASIER THAN IT LOOKS

    An IUD is a small object that goes inside your uterus.1

    The copper-bearing intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, flexible plastic frame with copper sleeves or wire around it.2

    A health care provider inserts it into a woman’s uterus through her vagina and cervix.2

    The hormones or the copper stop the sperm reaching the egg.1

    Sometimes, sperm does reach the egg (fertilization) so the IUD stops the egg from attaching to the wall of the uterus.1

    An IUD works for contraception for 5 or 10 years, depending on the type.3

    If you’re aged 40 or older when the IUD is fitted, it will work for contraception until after the menopause, when contraception isn’t needed.3

    Intrauterine Device - IUD - Barrier Method

    HOW TO

    An IUD can be fitted at any time during your menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant.4

    You'll be protected against pregnancy straight away.4

    Before your IUD is fitted, a doctor or nurse will check inside your vagina to check the position and size of your womb.4

    Your IUD can be removed at any time by a doctor or nurse.4

    Your periods and fertility will return to normal as soon as the IUD is removed.3

    A doctor or nurse will ask about your medical history to check if an IUD is suitable for you.4

    PROS OF INTRAUTERINE DEVICE

    • It can stay in place for up to 5 or 10 years (depending on the type),2 but can be removed any time (reversible).4
    • At 99%, it’s one of the most effective contraceptive methods.3
    • Suitable for women who want long-acting reversible contraception,2 for up to 5 or 10 years and wish to avoid daily, weekly or monthly regimen (fit and forget).3
    • It isn’t affected by other medications.2
    • It can be fitted up to five days after sex, or up to five days after the earliest time you could’ve ovulated (released an egg).5
    • There are no hormonal side effects, such as acne, headaches or breast tenderness.2
    • It can be used when breastfeeding.2
    • Fertility returns to previous levels once the IUD is removed.3
    Pros

    CONS OF INTRAUTERINE DEVICE

    • It requires a doctor or nurse for insertion and removal.5
    • It may cause cramps and/or irregular bleeding.4
    • Some people feel pain, cramps or dizziness when the IUD is put in or taken out.4
    • It may cause excessive/prolonged bleeding.2
    Cons

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

      Inserting the IUD usually takes around 5 minutes. It can be uncomfortable or painful for some people and you may be offered a local anesthetic.3

      Your doctor or nurse should talk to you about this beforehand.3

      You may get a period-type pain and some light bleeding for a few days after the IUD is fitted. Pain-relieving drugs can help with this.3

      An IUD does not interrupt sex.2

      However if Partner can feel IUD strings during sex, this happens sometimes when strings are cut too short.1

      If her partner finds the strings bothersome, describe and discuss this option:

      Strings can be cut even shorter so they are not coming out of the cervical canal. Her partner will not feel the strings, but it will make the removal procedure somewhat more difficult (may require a doctor).1

      Before your IUD is fitted, a GP or nurse will check inside your vagina to check the position and size of your womb.2

      It's very unlikely that your IUD will come out, but if you cannot feel the threads or think it's moved, you may not be protected against pregnancy.2

      See a GP or nurse straight away and use additional contraception, such as condoms, until your IUD has been checked.2

      Yes, it’s safe to use tampons.5 Take care not to pull on the IUD threads when you’re removing tampons.5

      You can expect some bleeding or spotting immediately after insertion. Irregular spotting can continue during the first month after insertion.1 

      You’ll find Changes in the bleeding pattern: Prolonged and heavy monthly bleeding, Irregular bleeding, More cramps and pain during monthly bleeding.1

      Most IUDs can stay in for 5–10 years depending on the type of device, the doctor or nurse will advise you. If you have had a copper device fitted after your 40th birthday it does not need to be changed unless you are having problems with it.5

      Your periods may become heavier, longer or more painful, though this may improve after a few months.2

      Yes. A woman who has not had children generally can use an IUD, but she should understand that the IUD is more likely to come out because her uterus may be smaller than the uterus of a woman who has given birth.1

      The IUD never travels to any other part of the body outside the abdomen.1

      The IUD normally stays within the uterus like a seed within a shell.1

      Rarely, the IUD may come through the wall of the uterus into the abdominal cavity.1

      This is most often due to a mistake during insertion.1

      If it is discovered within 6 weeks or so after insertion or if it is causing symptoms at any time, the IUD will need to be removed.1

      For a woman having menstrual cycles, an IUD can be inserted at any time during her menstrual cycle if it is reasonably certain that the woman is not pregnant.1

      Inserting the IUD during her monthly bleeding may be a good time because she is not likely to be pregnant, and insertion may be easier.1

      It is not as easy to see signs of infection during monthly bleeding, however.1

      There are two different typed of IUD, hormonal (Inter uterine system IUS) and non-hormonal.2

      The non-hormonal releases copper to stop you getting pregnant, and protects against pregnancy for between 5 and 10 years. It's sometimes called a "coil" or "copper coil".2

      The copper alters the cervical mucus, which makes it more difficult for sperm to reach an egg and survive. It can also stop a fertilized egg from being able to implant itself.2

      The hormonal releases the hormone progestogen to stop you getting pregnant and lasts for 3 to 5 years, depending on the brand.6

      It thickens the cervical mucus, which makes it more difficult for sperm to move through the cervix, and thins the lining of the womb so an egg is less likely to be able to implant itself.6

      No, a woman can become pregnant once the IUD is removed just as quickly as a woman who has never used an IUD, although fertility decreases as women get older.1

      Research studies find no increased risk of infertility among women who have used IUDs, including young women and women with no children.1

      Whether or not a woman has an IUD, however, if she develops pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and it is not treated, there is some chance that she will become infertile.1

      The IUD (intrauterine device), aka the copper coil, is a small T-shaped device that's put into your womb (uterus) by a doctor or nurse.3 the copper stops the sperm reaching the egg.1

      Sometimes, sperm does reach the egg (fertilization) so the IUD stops the egg from attaching to the wall of the uterus.1

      It works as soon as it's put in and lasts for 5 to 10 years, depending on the type.2

      References:

      1- Family Planning Handbook (FPHandbook).Chapter 10 -Copper-Bearing Intrauterine Device.available at: https://www.fphandbook.org/sites/default/files/Chapter_10_Eng.pdf. last accessed 26/1/2021

      2- National Health Services (NHS).Contraception.Intrauterine device (IUD).available at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception/iud-coil/. last accessed 26/1/2021

      3- SexWise.Contraception.IUD (Intrauterine device).available at: https://www.sexwise.org.uk/contraception/iud-intrauterine-device. last accessed: 26/1/2021

      4- Family Planning.Contraception.INTRA UTERINE DEVICE (IUD). available at: https://www.familyplanning.org.nz/advice/contraception/intra-uterine-device-iud. last accessed 26/1/2021

      5- SexWise.Intra uterine device (IUD) your guide. available at: https://www.sexwise.org.uk/sites/default/files/resource/2017-10/intrauterine-device-iud-your-guide.pdf. last accessed 26/1/2021

      6- National health services (nhs).contraception.intrauterine system (ius).available at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception/ius-intrauterine-system/ . Last accessed: 26/1/2021

      PP-PF-WHC-IQ-0007-1

      SUPPORTED BY

      A coalition of international partners with an interest in sexual and reproductive health